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Leipzig 2013 und die Britische Fahne.

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  • Ragnar
    antwortet
    Aye. Upside down flags from people who should know better, considering their striving for authenticity. rost:

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  • Bataaf
    antwortet
    Ragnar, you've got a problem!

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  • Ragnar
    hat ein Thema erstellt Leipzig 2013 und die Britische Fahne..

    Leipzig 2013 und die Britische Fahne.

    Es tut mir Leid, hier auf Englisch;

    For all those at Leipzig who thought it was amuzing to have British troops at a battle where they never where (rocket troops excepted), I would like to point out that MOST of you flew the flag UPSIDE FUCKING DOWN!!!

    The flag does not have reflection symmetry due to the slight pinwheeling of the St Patrick's and St Andrew's crosses, technically the counterchange of saltires. Thus, there is a right side up. Although the original specification of the Union Flag in the Royal Proclamation of 1 January 1801 did not contain a drawn pattern nor express which way the saltires should lie; they were simply "counterchanged" and the red saltire fimbriated, nevertheless, a convention was soon established which accords most closely with the description.

    When statically displayed, the hoist is on the observer's left. To fly the flag correctly, the white of St Andrew is above the red of St Patrick in the upper hoist canton (the quarter at the top nearest to the flag-pole). This is expressed by the phrases wide white top and broad side up.

    Interestingly, the first drawn pattern for the flag was in a parallel Proclamation of 1 January 1801 concerning civil naval ensigns, which drawing shows the red ensign (also to be used as a red jack by privateers). As it appears in the London Gazette, the broad stripe is at the top of the saltires on both sides, hoist and fly. That is not in accordance with the specification "counterchanged" as heraldry understands it.[11]

    It is often stated that a flag upside down is a form of distress signal or even a deliberate insult. In the case of the Union Jack, the difference is subtle and is easily missed by the uninformed. It is often displayed upside down inadvertently—even on commercially-made hand waving flags.[14]

    On 3 February 2009, the BBC reported that the flag had been inadvertently flown upside-down by the UK government at the signing of a trade agreement with Chinese premier Wen Jiabao. The error had been spotted by readers of the BBC news website who had contacted the BBC after seeing a photograph of the event.

    THE WIDE STRIPE ABOVE THE RED ST PATRICKS CROSS GOES UPWARDS WHEN SEEN WITH THE FLAG POLE AT THE LEFT!
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